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Tag: Board of Trustees

  • This Week in Princeton History for January 22-28

    This Week in Princeton History for January 22-28

    In this week’s installment in our recurring series, the faculty decide to prioritize coursework over national events, the Trustees make a radical change to financial aid, and more.

  • This Week in Princeton History for May 1-7

    This Week in Princeton History for May 1-7

    In this week’s installment of our recurring series, athletes enjoy a special treat after defeating Yale, a student is arrested for participation in “unbridled idiocy,” and more. May 1, 1934—In an interview with Redbook Magazine, Harold Dodds explains how the Great Depression is changing Princeton. In 1929, 20% of incoming students were self-supporting; now, 40%…

  • This Week in Princeton History for April 10-16

    In this week’s installment of our recurring series, state law raises the drinking age for college students, a new photography studio opens, and more. April 10, 1846—New Jersey law now prohibits tavern keepers from selling alcohol to college students under the age of 21. April 11, 1935—A total of 13 women’s organizations convene on campus…

  • This Week in Princeton History for August 8-14

    In this week’s installment of our recurring series, the College treasurer defends himself against rumors of embezzlement, a new graduate meets an untimely end, and more. August 9, 1844—With a high of 91 degrees, this is the hottest day of the year. It is “rather warmer” overall this year than in 1843. August 10, 1881—Rumors…

  • This Week in Princeton History for November 22-28

    In this week’s installment of our recurring series, new admissions requirements are approved, a new church building frees local residents from an obligation to rent pews in Nassau Hall, and more. November 24, 1845—Two seniors are dismissed from Princeton “in consequence of a quarrel & from an apprehension that it might lead to a duel.”…

  • This Week in Princeton History for September 27-October 3

    In this week’s installment of our recurring series, the Board of Trustees approves a plan for French classes, a student is sent home for involvement in a secret society, and more. September 27, 1843—The Board of Trustees vote to require students to pay a $5 deposit in order to study French, which will be refunded…

  • This Week in Princeton History for April 5-11

    In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, Princetonians join NOW’s rally in Washington, the Board of Trustees urge parents not to send their children too much money, and more. April 5, 1877—Marveling at the possibilities the intention of the telephone has…

  • This Week in Princeton History for September 28-October 4

    In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, a crisis delays dorm heating, a yellow fever epidemic has interrupted campus operations, and more. September 28, 1819—A visitor to Princeton’s Junior Orations observes that during one of the student speeches, the audience was…

  • Princeton’s “Saturnalia”: Commencement Prior to 1844

    2020 brought changes to Princeton University’s academic calendar, some planned, and some in response to the global coronavirus pandemic. This shift to an earlier start and end of Princeton’s academic year is not its first. Its historically most drastic change in the calendar came about for a surprising reason: Moving Commencement from September to June…

  • Debating Race at Princeton in the 1940s, Part I: Francis L. Broderick ’43

    This is the first post in a two-part series examining Princeton University’s debates over admitting African Americans in the 1940s, which began in earnest partly due to the dedication of one undergraduate in the Class of 1943, Francis Lyons “Frank” Broderick. By April C. Armstrong *14 and Dan Linke At first glance, Francis Lyons “Frank”…