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Tag: Prohibition

  • This Week in Princeton History for April 18-24

    In this week’s installment of our recurring series, war bonds are on sale, faculty prohibit students from participating in a 12-hour walking match, and more. April 20, 1942—Students can buy war bonds in Clio Hall today. April 21, 1979—A report on NBC Evening News considers the changing mores at Princeton University, where some students complain…

  • This Week in Princeton History for June 28-July 4

    In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, a London magazine notes the impact of Prohibition on Princetonians, Yale offers condolences on the death of a rising senior, and more. June 29, 1869—The American Whig Society celebrates its centennial. July 2, 1927—The…

  • This Week in Princeton History for March 18-24

    In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, the Class of 1877 takes a look at the Milky Way, a campus publication urges the institution to examine its own prejudices while continuing to fight bigotry beyond it, and more. March 18, 1932—Campus…

  • This Week in Princeton History for June 11-17

    In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, a journalist notes an increase in the number of graduates who received some form of financial aid, the Board of Trustees approves admitting women to some classes “on an experimental basis,” and more. June…

  • This Week in Princeton History for October 2-8

    In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, smoking in class comes to an end, a woman against female suffrage speaks in Alexander Hall, and more. October 3, 1981—A hawk crashes through a window in Firestone Library, knocking a 6-inch hole in…

  • This Week in Princeton History for July 25-31

    In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, Presbyterians worry about drinking, the campus operator has a bit less to do, and more. July 27, 1937—William H. Smathers, who represents New Jersey in the U.S. Senate, writes a response to a letter from…

  • Majority of James M. Beck Papers Now Available Online

    We are pleased to announce the completion of another digitization project. The bulk of the papers of James M. Beck (1861-1936), who enjoyed a long career as a lawyer, author, public speaker, Solicitor General, and U.S. Congressman, are now available online through the finding aid for collection MC007. Beck served as Solicitor General from 1921-1925…

  • This Week in Princeton History for April 6-12

    In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, Prohibition ends, the Board of Trustees urges parents not to send students money, and more. April 6, 1771—The Rittenhouse Orrery, the most noted scientific instrument of its time, arrives in Nassau Hall, where it…

  • This Week in Princeton History for November 3-9

    In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, Penn Jillette’s joke falls flat, the town decides on Prohibition, and more. November 3, 1975—Penn Jillette (now of Penn & Teller) tries to garner publicity for his upcoming performances with the “The Asparagus Valley…