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Tag: World War I

  • This Week in Princeton History for November 9-15

    In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, a graduate student gets help from the FBI to track down stolen microscopic slides, the YWCA opens a Hostess House for Navy officers in training, and more. November 9, 1959—A graduate student has gotten…

  • This Week in Princeton History for April 13-19

    In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, the Princetonian takes over the function of the Bulletin Elm, the baseball team plays its first game, and more. April 15, 1975—Two students receive a letter offering admission to Princeton in error on or about…

  • This Week in Princeton History for December 16-22

    In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, New Jersey’s governor pardons the marching band’s drum major, Jimmy Stewart’s singing gets positive reviews, and more. December 16, 1981—Drum Major Stephen Teager ’82 will not appear in Princeton Municipal Court today as planned,…

  • This Week in Princeton History for December 9-15

    In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, a typing class is starting, reform-minded undergraduates organize, and more. December 9, 1958—Registration is underway for an undergraduate typing course. For six dollars, students will learn how to type about 20-30 words per minute.

  • This Week in Princeton History for April 22-28

    In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, Earth Day is observed for the first time, professors hold a rummage sale to raise money for the ambulance corps in France, and more. April 22, 1970—Princeton Ecology Action leads the University’s first celebration…

  • This Week in Princeton History for April 8-14

    In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, the Board of Trustees bans dueling, the contract for construction of the infirmary is awarded, and more. April 8, 1917—James Barnes of the Class of 1891 outlines a proposal for privately financing an aviation…

  • This Week in Princeton History for February 25-March 3

    In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, the Graduate College remains in control of the U.S. Navy following the end of World War I, the local pastors association prays for their colleagues involved in the Civil Rights Movement, and more. February…

  • This Week in Princeton History for December 17-23

    In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, a shipment of coal mitigates a fuel shortage, the Triangle Club performs for Eleanor Roosevelt, and more. December 17, 1917—A new shipment of coal just after the last bit available ran out means there…

  • This Week in Princeton History for November 5-11

    In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, college football gets its start, town and gown celebrate the end of World War I, and more. November 5, 2001—A hazmat team comes to the Woodrow Wilson School to remove a suspicious letter mailed…

  • “Make This World Safe for the Babies”: The Liberty Loan Committee’s Appeal to American Women

    Exactly a century ago this summer, the United States began borrowing money from its own citizens. World War I brought with it the need for dramatic increases in government spending, and appealing to patriotism was one way to find the funding. The Liberty Loan Committee, one of the largest committees in American history, organized highly…